Africa > East Africa > Zambia > Agribusiness / Food

Agribusiness / Food in Zambia

  • ‘Betting on Africa to Feed the World’ – AfDB president Adesina

    BOTSWANA, 2017/10/17 The president of the African Development Bank, Akinwumi Adesina, will deliver the Norman Borlaug Lecture on Monday 16 October as part of the World Food Prize events taking place from October 16 to 20, 2017 in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. The Norman Borlaug Lecture under the title: “Betting on Africa to Feed the World”, will be held on World Food Day, October 16, in conjunction with the annual World Food Prize celebration.
  • Africa: How to Adapt to Beat Crippling Droughts

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/17 Right presently, 14 million people across southern Africa face going hungry due to the prolonged drought brought on by the strongest El Niño in 50 years. South Africa will import half of its maize and in Zimbabwe as a lot of as 75 % of crops have been abandoned in the worst-hit areas. With extreme weather, such as failed rains, and drought projected to become additional likely as a result of climate change, some farmers are by presently taking matters into their own hands, and pro-actively diversifying the crops they grow.
  • Africa And Middle East Famines: How China Can Do More

    CHINA, 2017/07/09 The unprecedented outbreak of famine early this year in Africa and the Middle East can be traced to conflict as the root cause. Can China step in to help mitigate the calamity through its Belt and Road initiative? Famine broke out in South Sudan in March 2017. At around the same time, the United Nations announced that Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen were as well on the verge of being hit by long draught, putting around 20 million at risk of starvation. The UN described this as an unprecedented humanitarian crisis and appealed to the international community to donate US$4.4 billion — with little success.
  • Africa: Factbox-World's Major Famines of the Last 100 Years

    BOTSWANA, 2017/03/12 People are currently starving to death in four nations, and 20 million lives are at risk in the next six months The U.N. children's agency UNICEF said on Tuesday nearly 1.4 million children were at "imminent risk" of death in famines in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. Famine was formally declared on Monday in parts of South Sudan, which has been mired in civil war since 2013. People are by presently starving to death in all four nations, and the World Food Programme says additional than 20 million lives are at risk in the next six months. The United Nations defines famine as at the same time as at least 20 % of households in an area face extreme food shortages, acute malnutrition rates exceed 30 %, and two or additional people per 10,000 are dying per day.
  • Zambia: Eight Die in Zambia As Food Handout Turns Into Stampede

    ZAMBIA, 2017/03/12 Some 35,000 people turned up to the event organized by a church group in Lusaka. Droughts across southern Africa have caused a sharp uptick in food prices in a country where poverty is by presently rampant. Authorities in Zambia said eight people died in the capital Lusaka next a stampede broke out during food handouts. Police spokeswoman Esther Katongo told the press that six women, one man and one boy were killed at the same time as tens of thousands turned up to the event at the Olympic Youth Development Center.
  • Zimbabwean farmer digs out weeds from a maize crop.

    ZAMBIA, 2016/05/22 As recently as March, Zambian Agriculture Minister Given Lubinda predicted a shrinking harvest this year due to erratic rains. The government was considering importing maize to cover a potential deficit, he said and, faced with food shortages, Zambian officials had even banned the export of corn and corn products on 5 April. The new announcement came as a amaze to a lot of people in Zambia and the rest of the region. The current El Nino weather phenomenon has been affecting the region for a while, with over 60 million people suffering its consequences, according to the United Nations.
  • Mutoba Ngoma is the entrepreneur behind Tapera Industries

    ZAMBIA, 2015/11/20 Any minute at this time next Mutoba Ngoma finished studying aeronautical engineering in the UK, he decided to return to his home country Zambia to start manufacturing biodiesel in his backyard. Almost 10 years later his company, Tapera Industries, has grown into a diversified eco-friendly business supplying biofuel and organic soap. And last year Ngoma was named a Mandela Washington Fellow. But why did a young aeronautical engineer decide to return to Zambia to try his hand at entrepreneurship and biodiesel production? His decision was based on the need to earn a sustainable gain, along with his desire to do work “that really matters”. He had been struggling to find a job in the UK in his highly competitive field at the same time as he came across a documentary on Brazil’s renewable energy advances, particularly in biofuel.