Africa > Social / CSR

Social / CSR in Africa

  • Couple Sent To Prison For Kissing In Public In Tunisia

    TUNISIA, 2017/10/21 A couple has been convicted on appeal in Tunis for “public indecency” next an altercation with police who arrested the couple while they were hugging in a car. The couple, who maintain that they were not kissing, were given a lighter sentence than the original term handed out at their October 4 trial, next widespread outrage on social media and in the press over the incident.
  • WFP chief appeals for peace on World Food Day

    WORLD, 2017/10/17 The Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) on Monday made an impassioned plea for peace amid mounting evidence of the links between conflict, migration and rising hunger.Concerns are growing that evolution in defeating world hunger is being reversed as record numbers of people flee their homes to escape fighting. “Someday someday, World Food Day will be a celebration of a peaceful and well-fed world. Sadly, that day seems very far off right presently. We have far too much violence and conflict, and that is why we have additional people who are hungry and in need of assistance,” said WFP Executive Director David Beasley.
  • Morocco: King Mohammed VI wants rethink on poverty projects

    MOROCCO, 2017/10/15 King Mohammed VI of Morocco delivered an uncompromising speech at the opening of a parliamentary session in Rabat on Friday, where he judged the model of development of the kingdom “unfit” to respond to the demands of Moroccans. He ordered the government to rethink its development model, telling legislators the country’s anti-poverty programs are no longer working. King Mohammed VI criticised the management of social programs and said “better firmness is needed to break with the laissez-faire and fraudulent practices that harm the interests of citizens,” sources say.
  • 'Loudspeaker for the youth': Sudan tunes in to a new wavelength as sanctions lift

    SUDAN, 2017/10/14 The success of a western-style radio station in Sudan, where 60% of the people are under 24, offers a sign that young people are embracing the glimmer of hope offered by improved world relations. A decade ago it was possible to count the number of radio stations in Sudan on one hand. The north African country was flush with oil money; its capital, Khartoum, was enjoying a property boom; and investors from China, India and the Gulf were flooding in. But for young Sudanese it had little going for it. “They were all just leaving the country,” recalls Taha Elroubi. “All the smart kids wanted to get out of Sudan.”
  • The Central African Republic could be on the brink of a bloodbath

    CENTRAL AFRICA REPUBLIC, 2017/10/13 Inside a sprawling tent camp protected by a U.N. tank and a line of barbed wire, Jerry Zoumatchi cradled an ancient rifle. He said he’d at no time touched a weapon until four months ago. But again rebels shot dead his father and his 17-year-old brother, sending him fleeing to this displaced-persons site in search of refuge and revenge. “I took up my gun to kill the [rebels] who killed my father and brother,” the 29-year-old said, fiddling with three bullets in his free hand. “I need to avenge the deaths.”
  • Grace Mugabe denies plotting to poison rival for Zimbabwe presidency

    ZIMBABWE, 2017/10/09 Wife of president Robert Mugabe says suspicions following illness of vice-president Emmerson Mnangagwa are nonsensical. The wife of Robert Mugabe, the 93-year-old president of Zimbabwe, has publicly denied that she was behind the attempted poisoning of her biggest rival to succeed her husband. In remarks broadcast on national TV on Friday, Grace Mugabe, 53, said the charge was “nonsensical”. Her remarks – described as “extraordinary” by observers – followed the claim a day before by one of Zimbabwe’s vice-presidents, Emmerson Mnangagwa, that he had been poisoned at the same time as he fell ill at a rally in August and had to be airlifted to hospital in South Africa.
  • Eritrea suffers new U.S. sanctions over human trafficking

    ERITREA, 2017/10/05 Eritrea has been hit by new United States (U.S.) sanctions according to a White Home statement. Under the new sanctions regime the U.S. said it was constraining Eritreans from engaging in educational or cultural exchange programs with the U.S. Eritrea has long been on a U.S. sanctions inventory for failing to combat human trafficking. The new measure is a further squeeze on Asmara’s relations with Washington. North Korea, Russia and Syria have all been put into the same bracket.
  • Cameroonians bemoan arrest of pregnant woman, social media still blocked

    CAMEROON, 2017/10/05 Cameroonians in the English-speaking regions are campaigning for the release of a five-month pregnant woman and her husband who were reportedly arrested by the security forces during the government repression on October 1. The arrest of Sola Yundze and her husband Sakwe Frank from their home in Limbe in the South-West Region has generated the #FreeSola campaign on social media despite the internet blockade over the completed three days.
  • KPMG's South Africa bosses purged over Gupta scandal

    SOUTH AFRICA, 2017/09/17 World auditor KPMG cleared out its South African leadership en masse on Friday next damning findings from an internal investigation into work done for businessmen friends of President Jacob Zuma. KPMG's investigation into its work for the Guptas, accused by a public watchdog of improperly influencing government contracts, identified no evidence of crimes or corruption, but found that work done for Gupta family firms "fell considerably short of KPMG's standards", the auditor said in a statement.
  • UN report attacks austerity budgets for growing inequality

    WORLD, 2017/09/16 Study says spending cuts have encouraged rise of robots and AI and heightened job insecurity, particularly for women Austerity budgets adopted by governments across the world since the 2008 financial crash are to blame for undermining the job security of millions of workers and threatening the evolution made by women in the workplace, according to a UN statement. The threat to jobs from the growing use of robots and artificial intelligence has been exacerbated by a lack of government investment and lack of national support for skills training, the statement as well said.