Africa > Agribusiness / Food

Agribusiness / Food in Africa

  • ‘Betting on Africa to Feed the World’ – AfDB president Adesina

    BOTSWANA, 2017/10/17 The president of the African Development Bank, Akinwumi Adesina, will deliver the Norman Borlaug Lecture on Monday 16 October as part of the World Food Prize events taking place from October 16 to 20, 2017 in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. The Norman Borlaug Lecture under the title: “Betting on Africa to Feed the World”, will be held on World Food Day, October 16, in conjunction with the annual World Food Prize celebration.
  • Ghana to commence the 2017/2018 cocoa season in October

    GHANA, 2017/10/05 Ghana’s industry regulator Cocobod plans to open the 2017/18 cocoa seasons on October 13, later than usual, next receiving part of a syndicated loan it signed this month to cover its purchasing needs, two company officials said on Saturday. The world’s second-major cocoa producer does not plan to lower the producer price at which it buys beans from farmers, however, despite calls from top grower Ivory Coast for it to do so, the officials told Reuters. In recent years Cocobod has opened its crop year in the initial week of October.
  • How fair is our food? Big companies take reins on sourcing schemes

    WORLD, 2017/09/06 From cocoa to tea, food and drink giants are setting their own standards for ethical sourcing of raw materials, moving away from third-party labels such as Fairtrade. Mondelez International (MDLZ.O), owner of chocolate brands Cadbury and Toblerone, Unilever (ULVR.L), behind tea brands such as Lipton and PG Tips, and Barry Callebaut, the world’s biggest producer of chocolate and cocoa products, have all introduced their own schemes. They say their targets are additional comprehensive and some claim their schemes are additional effective in tracking whether a product is ethically sourced each step of the way. With companies under financial pressure, analysts say it has as well been a way to save money.
  • U.S. warns South Sudan: Continued chaos is not acceptable, aid may be pulled

    UNITED STATES, 2017/09/03 The top U.S. official for humanitarian aid has delivered a stern warning to South Sudan’s president that the Trump administration is reexamining its policy toward one of the world's poorest and most dangerous countries as the African nation slides into lawlessness. Mark Green, the administrator for the United States Agency for International Development, met Friday with President Salva Kiir Mayardit. Green said he raised U.S. concerns over the dangers humanitarian aid workers face in delivering food and medicine in the country as well as a pervasive climate of criminal activity by government forces, criminal gangs and opposition forces. Since civil war erupted almost four years ago, a third of South Sudan’s population has become internally displaced or fled the country in Africa’s worst refugee crisis since the 1994 Rwandan genocide.
  • Sudan: Bread Shortage in Sudan's El Gedaref, Prices Soar in Darfur

    SUDAN, 2017/08/12 The capital of El Gedaref national has witnessed a severe bread shortage since Monday. A resident told Radio Dabanga that people must queue for hours at bakeries hoping to get some bread. Workers attributed the crisis to non-provision of the bakeries with quotas of flour prescribed by economic security.
  • Falling cocoa prices prompt joint action from Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana

    GHANA, 2017/08/01 Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana have agreed to set up a joint cocoa body aimed at improving cooperation for a key revenue-earner that has been heavily impacted by a sustained drop in world prices. Announced in June, the Ghana-Côte d'Ivoire Sustainable Cocoa Initiative (SCI) will see the neighbouring nations collaborate on policies to raise production and competitiveness. Other topical issues, such as cross-border smuggling – which can distort both farm gate earnings and crop quality – will as well be addressed.
  • South Africa targets increased investment for food and beverages

    SOUTH AFRICA, 2017/07/31 South Africa’s food and beverages industry is one of a handful of key agri-processing segments set to benefit from a new national-led investment incentive scheme. Launched at the end of June, the Department of Trade and Industry’s Agro-Processing Support Scheme (APSS) offers cost-sharing grants to be awarded to the price of 20-30% of basic investments.
  • Zimbabwe: 'So Many Questions' - Zim Bans Polystyrene, but Are There Alternatives?

    ZIMBABWE, 2017/07/17 Zimbabwe says a ban on polystyrene food packaging has come into force with immediate result in a bid to curb environmental and health hazards associated with the material. But a lot of are wondering if local producers and users of kaylite (as it's known locally) can they find alternatives quickly enough. In a public notice published on its Facebook page, Zimbabwe's national Environmental Management Agency (EMA) said the ban was "with immediate result".
  • Africa: How to Adapt to Beat Crippling Droughts

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/17 Right presently, 14 million people across southern Africa face going hungry due to the prolonged drought brought on by the strongest El Niño in 50 years. South Africa will import half of its maize and in Zimbabwe as a lot of as 75 % of crops have been abandoned in the worst-hit areas. With extreme weather, such as failed rains, and drought projected to become additional likely as a result of climate change, some farmers are by presently taking matters into their own hands, and pro-actively diversifying the crops they grow.
  • Congo-Kinshasa: New Study Reveals Economic Toll of Malnutrition in Democratic Republic of Congo

    CONGO KINSHASA, 2017/07/12 The social and economic costs of undernutrition are revealed in a new study released in Kinshasa today. The Cost of Hunger in Africa (COHA) study was undertaken by the government of DRC in collaboration with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), the African Union Commission (AUC), the New Partnership for Africa's Improvment(NEPAD), and the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC).