Asia > Eastern Asia > Social / CSR

Social / CSR in Eastern Asia

  • 5 charts that show how China is spending billions in foreign aid

    CHINA, 2017/10/14 China's foreign aid is sharply in focus this week with an unprecedented new data trove showing the country's growing global reach and detailing how Beijing spends its cash. In recent decades, the world's second largest economy has evolved from an aid recipient to a net aid donor. But a lack of official information on China's development activities had prevented the international community from understanding where and how the country spends its foreign aid. That's because the government considers its international development finance program to be a "state secret," according to AidData, a research lab at Virginia-based College of William & Mary.
  • Philippines' Duterte calls North Korea's Kim a 'fool' over nuclear ambitions

    NORTH KOREA, 2017/08/03 Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte on Wednesday described North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as a "fool" and a "son of a bitch", just days before Manila hosts an international conference certain to address Pyongyang's long-range missile tests. Duterte held nothing back in rebuking Kim for "playing with dangerous toys", setting the stage for next week's rare get-together, to be attended by foreign ministers of all the nations involved in the standoff on the Korean peninsula. North Korea is determined to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of hitting the United States and officials in Washington said Saturday's test of an intercontinental ballistic missile showed it may be able to reach most of the country.
  • Why did Japan leave South Sudan?

    JAPAN, 2017/07/10 In March 2017, the Japanese government announced it was terminating the Self-Defence Force’s (SDF) participation in the UN Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS). This abrupt withdrawal came only four months next the SDF’s deployment in November 2016 under the new upgraded mission of Kaketsuke Keigo (rush and rescue). Under Kaketsuke Keigo, the SDF’s mandate is to protect Japanese nationals, foreign aid workers and peacekeepers under threat. It was added to the security legislation passed by the Diet in September 2015 legalising Japan’s proactive contribution to peace. The South Sudan mission was the initial mission the SDF undertook under the new laws.
  • Mongolia’s mighty military diplomacy

    MONGOLIA, 2017/07/10 Mongolia is quickly becoming known for its world military presence. With China and Russia as its only direct neighbours, Mongolia faces a conundrum. Mongolia’s foreign policy is dominated by the necessity to balance the influences of its powerful neighbours and the need to gather support from like-minded nations. Mongolia refers to this as their ‘Third Neighbour Policy’, which aims to allow for economic and political self-determination independent of both China and Russia. Mongolia’s military is key to the execution of this policy.
  • Is Abe securing or threatening Japan’s peace and democracy?

    JAPAN, 2017/06/27 Despite his involvement in a series of political scandals, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe remains unscathed. And with a firm grip on power, his Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) has shifted its focus away from economic reform towards conservatives’ long-cherished goal of constitutional revision to allow for the use of military force abroad while increasing executive power at the expense of civil rights at home. Celebrating the 70th anniversary of Japan’s post-war constitution on 3 May, Abe took it upon himself to revise the document. To temper public opposition against changing the war-renouncing Article 9, the LDP has in recent parliamentary deliberations pledged to dispense a host of new social benefits. Abe has as well used recurring North Korean missile tests and simmering maritime disputes to create a sense of urgency and prompt public acceptance of constitutional revision before 2020. And from presently on, despite or precisely because of heightened military tensions, the public remains divided. A lot of fear for Japan’s post-war pacifist legacy and democracy.
  • Retirement Age Should Be Raised To 70, Says World Economic Forum

    JAPAN, 2017/05/29 The retirement age should rise to at least 70 in rich nations by 2050 as life expectancy rises above 100, according to a new statement, BBC News reveals. The World Economic Forum said that employees should continue working until 70 in nations such as the UK, US, Japan and Canada. The increase will be needed, as the number of people over 65 will additional than triple to 2.1 billion by 2050. By again, the number of workers per retiree will have halved to just four.
  • Are Japan and China competing in the Middle East?

    CHINA, 2017/04/28 Over the years, China and Japan have followed very different paths of involvement in the Middle East. The one policy that both nations have consistently shared though is steering well clear of the region’s politics and conflicts. This is starting to change. A navy soldier (L) of People's Liberation Army (PLA) stands guard as Chinese citizens board the naval ship ‘Linyi’ at a port in Aden, Yemen, 29 March 2015. (Photo: Reuters/Stringer). China and Japan are both highly dependent on Middle Eastern energy sources and are interested in expanding their economic interests in this area. Both nations are as well trying to strengthen their political stance in the region and become additional involved in large power Middle East politics.
  • Profiling in the Korean labour market

    NORTH KOREA, 2016/11/24 Korean workers are overworked, dissatisfied, and have the highest suicide rate in the OECD. At the same time, their productivity lags behind that of workers in other OECD nations. Evidence suggests that Korean employers do not provide their workers with an environment conducive to productivity nor do they match workers to well-suited jobs.
  • Shenzhen plans China's tallest skyscraper

    CHINA, 2016/09/04 Move aside Shanghai Tower, there's a new large boy in the town. Shenzhen, China's southern city neighboring Hong Kong, has announced a plan to build a skyscraper as high as 739 meters on the old site of Huanyu Tower in the newly designed Caiwuwei central financial district. If the plan goes through it means the new skyscraper over overtake 632-meter-tall Shanghai Tower to become the tallest building in China and the second-tallest in the world, according to the website of Luohu district of Shenzhen on Aug 9.
  • Canada to open seven new visa offices in China

    CHINA, 2016/09/02 The Canadian government will open seven additional visa application centres in China to help serve a growing number of Chinese tourists who are crossing the Pacific to explore Canada. The two nations confirmed the agreement Thursday in a joint statement that followed the initial leg of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s official visit to China.