Africa > East Africa > Ethiopia > Renewable energy

Renewable energy in Ethiopia

  • Africa’s major wind farm for power generation at Ashegoda,

    ETHIOPIA, 2013/10/27 Ethiopia will Saturday launch what it claims to be Africa’s major wind farm for power generation at Ashegoda, 18 km from Mekelle, the northern Tigray regional capital. Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation (EEPCo) said here Friday that the wind farm has a power generating capacity of 120MW and will produce about 400 million KWh a year. The Ashegoda project, completed on schedule within 36 months, included the construction of access and maintenance roads for next operations and a new sub-station which interfaces with the EEPCo grid system.
  • Geothermal energy development in Rift Valley countries

    BURUNDI, 2013/09/06 In its bid to assist African Rift Valley nations in the development of geothermal energy resource, the African Union Commission (AUC) and the Icelandic International Development Agency (ICEIDA) have signed a memorandum of considerate for cooperation in the field. According to the agreement initialed by the two parties here Wednesday, the AUC and ICEIDA will work together to develop and implement geothermal energy policy inclunding investment , regulatory and institutional guidelines, part other areas, in eleven African Rift Valley countries
  • Ethiopia looks to realise its geothermal energy potential

    ETHIOPIA, 2013/02/15 Ethiopia, like its fellow Great Rift Valley nations, has enormous geothermal energy potential. However, the costs involved and the need for skilled expertise have, until presently, been major obstacles. In late January, the Development Bank of Ethiopia announced that, over the next five months, it will offer an initial $20m to kickstart geothermal energy projects in the country's private sector as part of a programme funded by the World Bank. A further $20m is expected to be made available at a later stage.
  • Thermal Power Expansion to Begin at Aluto-Langano

    ETHIOPIA, 2013/02/05 Expansion work is to begin at the Aluto-Langano Geo-thermal Power Plant, in February, with the delivery of equipment to the site. The project, estimated to cost 35 million dollars, has by presently had 17 containers of materials delivered, with 10 additional currently at the dry port, according to Miskir Negash, public relations officer of the Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation (EEPCo). 
  • China Export Import Bank (Exim)

    ETHIOPIA, 2012/12/20 Ethiopia’s proposed Aysha I Wind Farm is drawing increasing investor attention, with the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the China Export Import Bank (Exim) expressing interest in financing the project. The Aysha Wind Power Project which envisages the construction of three plants with a total output capacity of 100 megawatts – launched by the Ethiopian Electric Power Company (EEP) – has seen multiple significant foreign investors indicate a desire to finance the new development, the most recent party to enter the financing fray being the EIB, EEP officials have revealed.
  • Ethiopia struggles to boost solar power output

    ETHIOPIA, 2012/12/17  Often dubbed the country with 13 months of sunshine, Ethiopia’s solar power industry is surprisingly lacking infrastructure and development. Investment remains low for renewable energy in the East African country and experts believe that the government must move forward on plans to boost solar power to meet growing energy needs. Miskir Negash, chief of corporate relations at the Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation, the national monopoly electricity provider, said recently that “the relative expense of solar energy compared to wind energy or hydro, especially for large projects, relegates its usefulness to smaller-scale projects.”
  • Ethiopia’s solar power industry

    ETHIOPIA, 2012/12/17  Often dubbed the country with 13 months of sunshine, Ethiopia’s solar power industry is surprisingly lacking infrastructure and development. Investment remains low for renewable energy in the East African country and experts believe that the government must move forward on plans to boost solar power to meet growing energy needs. Miskir Negash, chief of corporate relations at the Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation, the national monopoly electricity provider, said recently that “the relative expense of solar energy compared to wind energy or hydro, especially for large projects, relegates its usefulness to smaller-scale projects.”