People in East Africa

  • Former Malagasy president Albert Zafy dies aged 90

    MADAGASCAR, 2017/10/15 Madagascar’s former President Albert Zafy has died at the age of 90. Prof Zafy passed away Friday at the St Pierre hospital in Reunion Island, a region of France east of Madagascar, where he was receiving treatment. His ally and former Environment and Forestry minister Joseph Randriamiarisoa said Prof Zafy’s body will arrive at the Antananarivo Ivato International Airport on Saturday at 6pm.
  • Children on the move from Africa do not first aim to go to Europe, new UNICEF study shows

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/29 Children on the move into Europe from Africa take the decision to leave home on their own and do not initially intend to go to Europe. For the majority the systematic trauma and abuse they witnessed or suffered in Libya caused them to flee to Europe and take the terrifying Central Mediterranean sea route, according to a new study commissioned by UNICEF and carried out by REACH.
  • 'Family Planning is Not Only Life-Saving, But Empowering'

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/12 "Contraceptives empower women. And empowered women ... well, they transform societies" Contraceptives are "one of the greatest anti-poverty innovations the world has ever known", philanthropist Melinda Gates said on Tuesday, calling for family planning to be a world priority. Access to birth control boosts economic productivity by allowing women to earn an gain and leads to smaller families with additional resources to spend on children's health and education, Gates said.
  • Africa population growth key at AU summit

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/02
  • Africa facing shortfall of 50 million jobs by 2040

    BOTSWANA, 2017/07/02 Unemployment crisis will ravage the continent if it doesn’t opt for market-based development, according to statement by Tony Blair’s Institute Parts of Africa could face a massive unemployment crisis by 2040, with “catastrophic” consequences for the world economy, new research has found. The statement predicted a shortfall of 50 million jobs, which should serve as a “wake up call” for governments across much of the continent, inclunding international donors and agencies. According to the analysis by the Tony Blair Institute for World Change, based on world bank data, the labour force in sub-saharan Africa will be 823 million by 2040, up from 395 million in 2015. However, total number of jobs is only expected to hit 773 million, it said, leaving 50 million people in Africa unemployed.
  • Rwanda among safest countries globally

    RWANDA, 2015/09/29 Rwanda has been ranked part the safest nations in the world that provide conducive atmosphere to people who walk alone at night, according to the Gallup World Law and Order 2015 Statement. Gallup's Law and Order Index is a worldwide measure that gauges people's sense of personal security in their neighbourhoods and their personal experiences with crime and law enforcement. The statement released on Friday named Rwanda part few nations globally that have tightened safety and security of citizens hence enabling people to freely walk alone at night.
  • Africa’s demographics are driving global population growth

    AFRICA, 2013/09/15 Sewage spilling into the streets, shacks for homes and shanty towns stretching into the horizon. This is New York in the late 1800s, its grim scenes famously captured by local reporter Jacob Riis, who took chance of newly-invented flash photography to portray the city’s hard scrabble life The same was authentic of London, its own miserable conditions captured by the pen of Charles Dickens. The images conjured are little different to what one finds today across a lot of developing cities, whether Mumbai or Jakarta. And the experience of the New Yorks and Londons shows that a lot of of today’s most liveable cities were once anything but. So, how do cluttered urban sprawls become cities? And how do Africa’s people trends compare to other regions?
  • Famine and severe food insecurity in Somalia

    SOMALIA, 2013/07/21 Almost 260,000 Somali people, half of them children, died of dire hunger from 2010 to 2012, greatly additional than was feared at the time, an official statement said. Half of those who died were children aged below five -- almost a fifth of that age group died in the hardest-hit sector-- and UN officials admitted they could have done additional to prepare for the famine.  "Famine and severe food insecurity in Somalia claimed the lives of about 258,000 people between October 2010 and April 2012, inclunding 133,000 children under five," read the statement.