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Social / CSR in Sudan

  • 'Loudspeaker for the youth': Sudan tunes in to a new wavelength as sanctions lift

    SUDAN, 2017/10/14 The success of a western-style radio station in Sudan, where 60% of the people are under 24, offers a sign that young people are embracing the glimmer of hope offered by improved world relations. A decade ago it was possible to count the number of radio stations in Sudan on one hand. The north African country was flush with oil money; its capital, Khartoum, was enjoying a property boom; and investors from China, India and the Gulf were flooding in. But for young Sudanese it had little going for it. “They were all just leaving the country,” recalls Taha Elroubi. “All the smart kids wanted to get out of Sudan.”
  • Bill Gates sees US likely to maintain aid levels for Africa

    BOTSWANA, 2017/08/15 The US will probably maintain its current levels of aid to Africa despite President Donald Trump’s proposals to slash funding, according to Bill Gates, the world’s richest man. Trump said in May his government would no longer allocate funding for family planning, a move that has the potential to undermine aid programs in the poorest nations in the world. However, with Congress in control of the budget, it’s unlikely that all cuts proposed by the Trump government will go ahead next year, Gates said in an interview in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s commercial capital.
  • Sudan: Darfur Displaced - 'Trump Sanctions Decision a Step in the Right Direction'

    SUDAN, 2017/07/16 The displaced people in Darfur camps describe US President Donald Trump's decision to postpone lifting economic sanctions imposed on Sudan as a step in the right direction and a moral support for the genocide victims in Darfur, Nuba Mountains, and Blue Nile. In an interview with Radio Dabanga, El Shafee Abdallah, coordinator of the Central Darfur camps, appealed to the Trump government "not to follow the course of former President Obama, who has spent eight years in power without implementing any of the resolutions issued against the regime in Khartoum by the International Criminal Court."
  • Why did Japan leave South Sudan?

    JAPAN, 2017/07/10 In March 2017, the Japanese government announced it was terminating the Self-Defence Force’s (SDF) participation in the UN Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS). This abrupt withdrawal came only four months next the SDF’s deployment in November 2016 under the new upgraded mission of Kaketsuke Keigo (rush and rescue). Under Kaketsuke Keigo, the SDF’s mandate is to protect Japanese nationals, foreign aid workers and peacekeepers under threat. It was added to the security legislation passed by the Diet in September 2015 legalising Japan’s proactive contribution to peace. The South Sudan mission was the initial mission the SDF undertook under the new laws.
  • Over 30,000 Somalis Return From Conflict-Hit Yemen

    SOMALIA, 2017/06/06 Some 30,600 Somalis have reportedly returned to Somalia from Yemen since the beginning of war in Yemen in 2015, the UN refugee agency said on Friday. The UNHCR said an increasing number of Somalis are approaching the agency for assistance to support their return, citing safety concerns and limited access to services in Yemen. "UNHCR is presently providing some support to those choosing to return on their own," the UN agency said in a statement.
  • South Sudan: EU Citizens Evacuated From South Sudan

    SUDAN, 2016/07/15 Germany and Italy have begun evacuations from South Sudan next fighting between rival Sudanese factions in Juba. Berlin and Rome said people of other nationalities were as well being airlifted to Uganda and Djibouti. A fragile ceasefire seemed to hold in South Sudan's capital Juba on Wednesday as Germany, Italy and the USA implemented emergency measures and aid workers said bodies remained lying on streets. At least 270 people were killed, mostly last Friday, in clashes between President Salva Kiir's troops and former rebels loyal to Vice President Riek Machar.
  • South Sudan capital rocked by renewed violence,

    SOUTH SUDAN, 2016/07/11
  • South Sudan president fails to sign peace deal

    SOUTH SUDAN, 2015/08/18 South Sudan President Salva Kiir failed to sign a peace transaction proposed by regional leaders on Monday, saying he required additional time, the mediator of the crisis said. Seyoum Mesfin, the mediator for the regional group IGAD, said Kiir's side required two weeks before signing the peace transaction that was accepted by the South Sudanese rebels. "In the next 15 days, the government will come back to Addis Ababa to finalise the peace agreement," Seyoum said.
  • Sudan - "Your Silence Is a Shame to Humanity."

    SUDAN, 2015/04/26 Since 2012, an average of three bombs a day have been dropped indiscriminately by the government of Sudan onto civilians living in rebel held areas. With humanitarian access denied by the government and increasing numbers being displaced, people's ability to survive grows additional precarious by the day. A new statement launched today by the International Refugee Rights Initiative and the National Human Rights Monitoring Organisation brings the voices of civilians living through the conflict in Sudan's Southern Kordofan National to the international community. Focusing on the devastating impact of the conflict on each aspect of people's lives, the statement highlights the extraordinary resilience and resistance of the civilian people. Inevitably, however, this resilience is as well being worn away by the continuing onslaught.
  • Arab Youth Survey Report 2015

    BAHRAIN, 2015/04/25 Confidence part Arab youth that the Arab Spring would bring positive change across the region is declining and as a result they are uncertain whether democracy could ever work in the Middle East. This is the headline finding of the 7th Annual ASDA’A Burson-Marsteller Arab Youth Survey released today. - Arab youth see the rise of ISIS as the biggest obstacle facing the region - Youth are keen to start their own business as concerns about unemployment continue - The UAE remains the majority popular country to live in and emulate and Saudi Arabia is viewed as the region’s biggest ally - A lot of view the Arabic language as central to their identity but believe it is losing its price to English