Asia > South-Eastern Asia > Philippines > The Philippines’ construction industry

Philippines: The Philippines’ construction industry

2010/08/10

The Philippines’ construction industry is headed for prosperous times, according to both analysts and the government. The residential and infrastructure segments are set to expand due to high request, though questions remain as to where the funding for some of these projects will come from.
Figures issued by the National Statistics Office (NSO) in mid-July showed a sharp jump in the price of private sector construction developments for the prime quarter of the year, with project spending totaling $1bn, up by 59.5% year-on-time(y-o-y). Though there had been strong increase over the year, which ended March 31, the NSO statement suggested there had been a slowdown in the prime quarter of this year compared to the last three months of 2009, with a slight fall in the number of construction permits issued in Q1.
Of the 29,992 permits issued in the prime quarter of the year, around 23,600 were for residential projects, a 20% increase y-o-y, while the $483m worth of non-residential projects approved represented a 130% jump in price over the same quarter of 2009.
While this flood of capital into the industry has raised fears that a bubble could be developing in the housing market, others only see the strengthening of an by presently powerful sector of the economy. According to Victor Abola, an economist at the University of Asia and the Pacific, there is little possibility of a bubble in the real estate segment. Given the current 3m shortfall in residential units, combined with next needs and the industry’s delivery rate of just 250,000 units a year, it is unlikely that the market could become overheated and again crash, he said in an interview with a local business daily on July 19.
“People who talk about a bubble are looking most probably in the higher-priced luxury apartments,” he said, adding that with the residential market dominated by middle- to low-end projects and with potential buyers looking to use apartments for living purposes rather than as investment vehicles, any concerns over a bubble could be discounted.
While request will drive the residential segment, the need to address the country’s infrastructure constraints will prompt a surge in the non-residential component of the industry, Abola said. “We will have a construction boom in this decade because of things – infrastructure and housing,” he said.
However, while conference the country’s pressing infrastructure needs is expected to give impetus to the construction sector, equally pressing is the need to find the funding to pay for these projects. The government’s finances are stretched, with last year’s budget having been exceeded by $2.5bn and with the national having booked $4.2bn worth of red ink in the prime months of 2010. This has left newly installed President Benigno Aquino III with little room for error if he tries to further stimulate the economy or to invest in essential infrastructure projects.
Aquino’s solution to the funding shortfall, as outlined in his prime address to the country on July 26, was to join forces with the private sector to build for the next. By adopting what he described as a new and creative approach, Aquino said the “dearth of funds” would be overcome. That approach involves public-private partnerships (PPP), which the president said would see the national identify priority projects and again work with private investors to turn these plans into reality.
To facilitate private involvement in major construction and infrastructure developments, Aquino said the administrative procedures would as well be streamlined. “We will make sure that the build-operate-and-transfer (BOT) projects will undergo quick and efficient processes,” he said. “With the help of amount government agencies concerned and the people, a process that used to take as short as a year and as long as a decade will presently only take months.”
Part the projects Aquino cited in his address was the construction of an expressway from Manila to Cagayan Valley passing through Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, and Nueva Vizcaya, along with a network of farm-to-market roads across the country.
On the back of increased infrastructure and residential construction, the building trade could expand by between 7% and 9% this year, according to Manolito Madrasto, the executive director of the Philippine Constructors Association (PCA). That said, the industry could post double-digit increase depending on the request for residential units and activity in the infrastructure segment, he told local media in mid-July.
“In the PCA, we are trying to be as conservative as possible. We don’t want to raise hopes too high,” Madrasto said.
At least some of those hopes are pinned on the government’s ability to fast-track its BOT business model and deliver on its PPP programme in a way that would make pouring large amounts of money into high-profile projects appealing to private investors. Having laid the foundations for partnership with the private sector, the national presently needs to build on its promises.
Related Articles
  • Migration and Women’s Health: A Neglected Issue in Need of Action

    2016/06/11 There is a current tendency to think of migrants as young men. Although in some cases this stereotype still holds authentic, patterns of migration are rapidly changing and additional must be done to ensure that vulnerable female migrants are protected, particularly in terms of their health. Although before in the European “migrant crisis” the vast majority of those arriving were men (over 70% of irregular migrants into Greece and Italy in June 2015 were adult men), this gender gap has gradually decreased over the completed year and UNHCR estimates that men presently make up only around 40% of migrants arriving in the Mediterranean. Forced movements in particular seem to affect higher numbers of women and children. Indeed, over three quarters of Syrian refugees registered by UNHCR are either women or children under the age of 18.
  • Japans emperor visiting the Philippines, a former WWII site

    2016/01/28 Japan's emperor said Tuesday that his country must remember the tremendous loss of life in the Philippines during World War II, as he and his wife embarked for a four-day visit to the Southeast Asian country. "A lot of Filipinos, Americans and Japanese lost their lives in the Philippines during the war," Emperor Akihito said in a short statement he read before departing from Tokyo. "Particularly in the battle in Manila, a tremendously large number of innocent Filipino civilians were victims. Upon making this visit, we need to bear this in mind at all times."
  • Global growth will be disappointing in 2016: IMF's Lagarde

    2016/01/02 World economic increase will be disappointing next year and the outlook for the medium-term has as well deteriorated, the chief of the International Monetary Fund said in a guest article for German newspaper Handelsblatt published on Wednesday. IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said the prospect of rising interest rates in the United States and an economic slowdown in China were contributing to uncertainty and a higher risk of economic vulnerability worldwide. Added to that, increase in world trade has slowed considerably and a decline in raw material prices is posing problems for economies based on these, while the financial sector in a lot of nations still has weaknesses and financial risks are rising in emerging markets, she said.
  • Two additional years of schooling raises capacity concerns in the Philippines

    2015/12/28 Long-planned reforms to extend the length of schooling in the Philippines by two years are expected to significantly improve employment prospects for the country’s younger generations, while as well creating investment opportunities in private education. Implementing this reform has been a policy priority for the government of President Benigno Aquino III, which is keen for the Philippines to lose its status as one of only a handful of nations with fewer than 12 years of basic education. Starting from next year, the new system will take children from kindergarten through to grade 12, while as well sharpening the focus on maths and science in a bid to dramatically improve test scores, and boost post-secondary enrolment and graduate employment. While Philippines students stand to benefit from the reforms, near-term challenges, led by space constraints across the country’s existing network of secondary schools, will need to be addressed.
  • Philippines push to list SMEs

    2015/12/27 A drive to highlight the benefits of listing on the Philippines Stock Exchange (PSE) to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is gaining pace. Officials will be hoping that the push to persuade additional SMEs to inventory sets the scene for heightened activity on the exchange in 2016, next fewer than expected initial public offerings (IPOs) were carried out this year. Realising potential While micro and SMEs account for 99% of businesses operating in the Philippines and almost two-thirds of employment, only a handful of SMEs have listed on the PSE’s restructured Small, Medium and Emerging Board (SMEB) since it was initial launched in 2001.