Europe > Western Europe > France > Monoprix opens 1st international supermarket chain in Libya

France: Monoprix opens 1st international supermarket chain in Libya

2013/08/12

France's Monoprix will be the initial international supermarket chain to set up shop in Libya, with 52 outlets in the next five years.

Monoprix was brought to Libya by the HBG group under the Libyan entrepreneur Husny Bey through a franchising with the Tunisian Société Nouvelle Maison de la Ville de Tunis (SNMVT), which uses the Monoprix name.

The initial supermarket was opened in the capital in March on a surface area of some 5,000 square metres and an extra 52 will be opened over the coming months in other areas of the capital and the rest of the country.

The news shows the growing interest that large companies have in Libya next the 2011 uprising that put an end to the Gaddafi regime. ''The HGB group would as well be interested in bringing an Italian large-scale distribution company to the Libyan market,'' Husny Bey told ANSAmed. 

Related Articles
  • France's Macron outlines new approach to African policy

    2017/11/29 French President Emmanuel Macron has outlined a new approach to relations with Africa as he begins a regional trip starting with Burkina Faso. He said he was "from a generation that would not tell Africans what to do". He as well said he would declassify secret French files on the former colony's assassinated leader, Thomas Sankara. Mr Macron is on a three-day trip in West Africa, taking in Burkina Faso, a European-African summit in Ivory Coast and Ghana.
  • As Russia threatens, Sweden ponders joining NATO

    2017/09/24 SWEDEN’S Aurora-17 drill, which continues until the end of September, is the biggest war game that the supposedly neutral country has carried out for 23 years. Not only does it involve 19,000 of Sweden’s armed forces (about half of them), inclunding its Home Guard, but as well additional than 1,500 troops from Finland, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, France, Norway and America. All except Finland are members of NATO, the large western alliance.
  • Carmakers face billions in European CO2 fines from 2021

    2017/09/23 Large-name carmakers inclunding Volkswagen and Fiat Chrysler face fines running into the billions for failure to meet tough new European carbon dioxide emissions limits slated for 2021, a study has found. "Only four out of 11 carmakers are estimate to meet the EU 2021 CO2 emission target, with the rest facing significant fines," researchers from British firm PA Consulting said in a statement Friday. European Union nations agreed in 2014 that carmakers should limit CO2 emissions to 95 grammes per kilometre across their entire model range within seven years.
  • UK growth will trail Italy, France and Germany next year, says OECD

    2017/09/23 Italy, France and Germany will grow faster than Britain next year as Brexit uncertainty continues to weigh on consumer confidence and deter much-needed business investment , according to the new economic forecasts by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Pound’s Brexit slide has pushed up inflation and dampened purchasing power, says estimate. The UK’s GDP increase will drop from 1.6% this year to 1% next year, in line with the OECD’s previous estimate, but Italy’s national gain will grow by 1.2% in 2018, up 0.4 % points from the estimate in the June.
  • Aluminium-Lithium Alloys Fight Back

    2017/09/16 At the same time as it comes to the aviation industry, new technologies and manufacturing techniques have been mounting a silent revolution in the new generation of commercial twin-aisle aircraft: the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and Airbus A350. Both these aircraft contain around 50% of CFRP composites, as opposed to their previous iterations where aluminium alloys had dominated. This explains why, at the same time as Boeing and Airbus introduced these two crafts several years ago, most experts thought that the next generation of planes would be made out of composites, a trend that would again expand to include smaller jets – but as turns out, they were wrong.