Africa > East Africa > Malawi > Malawi Geography Profile

Malawi: Malawi Geography Profile

2013/08/18

Nyika Plateau, Nyika National Park, Malawi
 
Land
 
Malawi stretches about 520 miles (840 km) from north to south and varies in width from 5 to 100 miles (10 to 160 km). It is bordered by Tanzania to the north, Lake Malawi to the east, Mozambique to the east and south, and Zambia to the west.

Relief
 
While Malawi’s landscape is highly varied, four basic regions can be identified: the East African (or Great) Rift Valley, the central plateaus, the highlands, and the isolated mountains. The East African Rift Valley—by far the dominant feature of the country—is a massive troughlike depression running through the country from north to south and containing Lake Malawi (north and central) and the Shire River valley (south). The lake’s littoral, situated along the western and southern shores and ranging from 5 to 15 miles (8 to 24 km) in width, covers almost one-tenth of the total land area and is dotted with swamps and lagoons.
The Shire valley stretches some 250 miles (400 km) from the southern end of Lake Malawi at Mangochi to Nsanje at the Mozambique border and contains Lake Malombe at its northern end. The plateaus of central Malawi rise to elevations of 2,500 to 4,500 feet (760 to 1,370 metres) and lie just west of the Lake Malawi littoral; the plateaus cover about three-fourths of the total land area. The highland areas are mainly isolated tracts that rise as much as 8,000 feet (2,400 metres) above sea level. They comprise the Nyika, Viphya, and Dowa highlands and Dedza-Kirk mountain range in the north and west and the Shire Highlands in the south. The isolated massifs of Mulanje (which reach 9,849 feet [3,002 metres], the highest point in the country) and Zomba (which reach 6,846 feet [2,087 metres]) represent the fourth physical region. Surmounting the Shire Highlands, they descend rapidly in the east to the Lake Chilwa–Phalombe plain.

Drainage and soils
 
The major drainage system is that of Lake Malawi, which covers some 11,430 square miles (29,600 square km) and extends beyond the Malawi border. It is fed by the North and South Rukuru, Dwangwa, Lilongwe, and Bua rivers. The Shire River, the lake’s only outlet, flows through adjacent Lake Malombe and receives several tributaries before joining the Zambezi River in Mozambique. A second drainage system is that of Lake Chilwa, the rivers of which flow from the Lake Chilwa–Phalombe plain and the adjacent highlands.
Soils, distributed in a complex pattern, are composed primarily of red earths, with brown soils and yellow gritty clays on the plateaus. Alluvial soils occur on the lakeshores and in the Shire valley, while other soil types include hydromorphic (excessively moist) soils, black clays, and sandy dunes on the lakeshore.

Climate
 
There are two major seasons—the dry season, which lasts from May to October, and the wet season, which lasts from November to April. Temperatures vary seasonally, and they tend to decrease on average with increasing elevation. Nsanje, in the Shire River valley, has a mean July temperature in the high 60s F (low 20s C) and an October mean in the mid-80s F (high 20s C), while Dedza, which lies at an elevation of additional than 5,000 feet (1,500 metres), has a July mean in the high 50s F (mid-10s C) and an October mean in the high 60s F (low 20s C). On the Nyika Plateau and on the upper levels of the Mulanje massif, frosts are not uncommon in July. Annual precipitation levels are highest over parts of the northern highlands and on the Sapitwa peak of the Mulanje massif, where they are about 90 inches (2,300 mm); they are lowest in the lower Shire valley, where they range from 25 to 35 inches (650 to 900 mm).
 
 
Plant and animal life

The natural vegetation pattern reflects the country’s diversity in relief, soils, and climate. Savanna (grassy parkland) occurs in the dry lowland areas. Miombo woodlands—sparse, open deciduous woodland characteristic of dry parts of eastern Africa—are an significant habitat, particularly for the country’s large mammal populations. Woodlands with species of acacia trees cover isolated, additional fertile plateau sites and river margins. Grass-covered broad depressions, called madambo (singular: dambo), dot the plateaus. Grasslands and evergreen forests are found in conjunction on the highlands and on the Mulanje and Zomba massifs.
However, Malawi’s natural vegetation has been altered significantly by human activities. Swamp vegetation has given way to agricultural species as swamps have been drained and cultivated. Much of the original woodland has been cleared, and, at the same time, forests of softwoods have been planted in the highland areas. High people density and intensive cultivation of the Shire Highlands have as well hindered natural succession there, while wells have been sunk and rivers dammed to irrigate the dry grasslands for agriculture.
 
Game animals abound only in the game reserves, where antelope, buffalo, elephants, leopards, lions, rhinoceroses, and zebras occur; hippopotamuses live in Lake Malawi. The lakes and rivers of Malawi contain hundreds of species and numerous families of fish. Lake Malawi is particularly renowned for its remarkable biodiversity—an enormous range of fish species inhabit the lake, most of them endemic—and its southern region, as part of Lake Malawi National Park, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984. The majority common and commercially significant fish found in Malawi include the endemic tilapia, or chambo (nest-building freshwater fish); catfish, or mlamba; and minnows, or matemba.
 
The Ministry of Mines, Natural Resources, and Environmental Affairs is charged with the responsibility of ensuring the protection of Malawi’s environment, mainly through the implementation of the Environmental Management Act of 1996. Part the major concerns are efficient resource utilization, land degradation, deforestation, conservation of marine life, biodiversity, climate change, ozone layer protection, sewage, the pollution of water from agriculture runoff such as fertilizers, endangered species, and industrial pollution. The majority of pollution comes from greenhouse gas emissions, mostly from the usage of coal and charcoal, natural gas, and petroleum.
Location: 

Southern Africa, east of Zambia

Geographic coordinates: 

13 30 S, 34 00 E

Map references: 

Africa

Area comparative: 

slightly smaller than Pennsylvania

Land boundaries Total: 

2,881 km

Land boundaries Note: 

Climate: 

sub-tropical; rainy season (November to May); dry season (May to November

Terrain: 

narrow elongated plateau with rolling plains, rounded hills, some mountains

Natural resources: 

limestone, arable land, hydropower, unexploited deposits of uranium, coal, and bauxite

Natural hazards: 

NA

Environment - current issues: 

deforestation; land degradation; water pollution from agricultural runoff, sewage, industrial wastes; siltation of spawning grounds endangers fish populations

Geography note: 

landlocked; Lake Nyasa, some 580 km long, is the country's most prominent physical feature