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Japan: Japan Art / Culture Profile 2012

2012/03/14

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Japan Art / Culture Profile 2012

Japanese culture is partly Chinese and partly indigenous, but the Japanese have adapted and do not simply sesont merely to imitate the culture of the continent. Since the mid-19th century, Japan has been increasingly influenced by Western culture than that of its neighbors. Adoption of more Western ways produces sharp contrasts between new and old. Buildings and clothing, for example, are now seen in both traditional and western styles.
Among the forces that helped shape the character of Japanese Buddhism, Shinto, and Confucian beliefs, the effects of a long feudal period, and the influences of the Japanese industrial revolution. Industrialization has brought a change from rural to urban life. American influences have been particularly strong since the Second World War.
 
Culture
Japanese culture is partly Chinese and partly indigenous and adapted for the Japanese not only imitate the culture of the continent. Since the mid-19th century, Japan has been increasingly influenced by Western culture than that of its neighbors. Adoption of more Western ways produces sharp contrasts between new and old. Buildings and clothing, for example, are now seen in both traditional and western styles.
Among the forces that helped shape the character of Japanese Buddhism, Shinto, and Confucian beliefs, the effects of a long feudal period, and the influences of the Japanese industrial revolution. Industrialization has brought a change from rural to urban life. American influences have been particularly strong since the Second World War.

Arts
Japanese art was heavily influenced by Chinese art. The mainland has the technique of ink painting on silk and Buddhist influences in sculpture and painting. A school of Zen Buddhism developed landscape after the 13th century. Japanese prints from the 17th and 18th centuries had a profound eifect on Western art. original contributions that have also been made in architecture. Traditional arts also include landscaping, bonsai, growing dwarf trees, ikebana, floral art, ceramics, origami, paper folding.
Flourishing throughout Japan are not classic plays in which actors wearing masks representing their character, Bunraku puppet theater and kabuki theater with songs and stylized dances. An important part of Japanese culture is the tea ceremony, a very formal ritual, of which there are many variations. As a way to entertain guests, it is considered the best expression of traditional etiquette. Some of the traditional Japanese music arts, especially classical dance and tea ceremony, are part of the repertoire of geisha women performing artists, groups of men.
 
Life Style
In Japan, the family is a traditional institution and strong. It has a formal structure of the authority vested in the heads of men of the family. The woman should be subordinate. Children learn discipline and their respective roles in the family at an early age. The son are preferred to daughters, the eldest son is superior to all others. However, many of the most repressive of the family, such as that of parents to determine marriages have declined since the Second World War.
Japanese homes are known for their simplicity. Traditional houses are built of wood. In many homes as paper-covered wooden frames, called shoji, are used for doors and windows. Being lightweight and easy to move, they allow much of the house to be opened outside of the door. Some houses are connected by landscaped gardens. Rooms typically have thick straw mats called tatami mats on the floor and very little furniture.