Asia > Eastern Asia > China > Pilot free trade zone in Shanghai to build open economy

China: Pilot free trade zone in Shanghai to build open economy

2013/10/28

The decision to establish a pilot free trade zone (FTZ) in Shanghai stems from a number of internal and external problems that China presently faces.

While slowing economic increase is forcing the country to seek out deeper reforms and new increase engines, external moves that could be billed as ‘foreign aggression’ have played a bigger role in prompting the creation of the FTZ.

The influence of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), initiated by Singapore in 2005, grew significantly next the United States signed up in 2008. Since again, the TPP has moved in line with American interests.

As part of its bid to build a unified market in the Pacific Rim by 2020, the TPP requires member nations to eliminate all tariffs and open up their agricultural and financial services sectors. As such, Japan and developing nations like China have found themselves in the crosshairs.

The US-influenced TPP did not receive a positive response from Asia Pacific nations at initial. But next the United States convinced Japan and Vietnam to join the negotiations (it as well signed an FTA with South Korea in October 2011), China has had to reconsider its position. China knows it will pay a higher price if it is excluded from such a unified market.

China expressed interest in joining the TPP for the initial time during a fresh round of the Sino–US Strategic and Economic dialogue in July. However, time is of the essence if it hopes to meet the TPP’s requirements for full liberalisation before the 2020 deadline.

And despite rumours about what reforms the FTZ may herald, its long-term policy objectives will generally remain consistent with the requirements of the TPP.

Construction of the FTZ is part of a series of reforms by Premier Li Keqiang, which are focused on de-leveraging deficit, reducing financial support and upgrading industrial infrastructure in order to better allocate resources through a market mechanism. A lot of scholars have compared the Shanghai FTZ to the situation in Shenzhen in 1979, at the same time as China began experimenting with additional liberal economic policies. Others have drawn analogies with the country joining the World Trade Organization in 2001.

The FTZ has four major goals. The initial is achieving zero tariffs on all merchandise traded, inclunding agricultural products. The second involves protecting intellectual property rights, and making sure that labour, environmental and safety conditions meet international standards. The third centres on enhancing economic and regulatory fairness and transparency, and removing subsidies and preferential support for specific industries and national-owned enterprises. The fourth is to fully liberalise the financial services industry, and open up the capital account to facilitate the free convertibility of currency and movement of capital.

The FTZ should as well aim to include all major industries to create a equitable sense of competition part national-owned, private and foreign businesses. It should follow the negative-inventory approach of granting access to any businesses that are not prohibited, and change the traditional method of examining and approving tenants to a registration-based system.

In short, the pilot FTZ scheme should serve as a perfect opportunity to build an open economy on a macroeconomic level by testing out innovative systems in the context of world competition. From this, China can learn about other economic management methods and assess the impact of full liberalisation.

Bo Chen is Deputy Chair at the Department of International Economics and the Deputy Director of the Research Center on Free Trade Zone, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.

Comments

Related Articles
  • China and India get iPhone 6 models

    2014/10/18 iPhone fever hit China afresh as the 6 and 6 Plus handsets officially went on sale there on Friday. Software security concerns raised by government regulators had delayed their launch in the world’s major smartphone market. Apple won approval to sell the phones next it reassured Beijing they do not have security “backdoors” through which US intelligence agencies could access users’ data.
  • Chinese consumer prices slowed slightly additional than expected in September

    2014/10/16 Chinese consumer prices slowed slightly additional than expected in September, figures from the National Bureau of Statistics showed on Wednesday. Consumer prices grew 1.6 % year-over-year in September following the 2 % rise in August. Economists had expected inflation to slow to 1.7 %. This marked the second consecutive month of slowing. a Part the major sub-categories, food prices advanced 2.3 % in September, contributing 0.78 % points to the in general increase in consumer prices.
  • China Trade Data Due On Monday

    2014/10/13 China will on Monday release September figures for imports, exports and trade balance, highlighting a modest day for Asia-Pacific economic activity. The trade balance is expected to show a surplus of $41.40 billion, down from $49.84 billion in August. Imports are expected to slide 3.0 % on year next falling 2.4 % in the previous month. Exports are called higher by 13.0 % next jumping 9.4 % a month before.
  • China’s Inscrutable Contraction

    2014/10/13 Kenneth Rogoff former chief economist of the IMF, is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Harvard University. While virtually each country in the world is trying to boost increase, China's government is trying to slow it down to a sustainable level. As China shifts to a additional domestic-request driven, services-oriented economy, a transition to slower trend increase is both inevitable and desirable. But the challenges are immense, and no one should take a soft landing for granted. As China's economy grows relative to the economies of its trading partners, the efficacy of its export-led increase model must inevitably fade. As a corollary, the returns on massive infrastructure investment , much of which is directed toward supporting export increase, must as well fade.
  • Golden Rule Why Beijing Is Buying gold

    2014/10/10 If China were to convert a relatively modest part of its $4 trillion foreign exchange reserves into gold, the country’s currency could take on unexpected strength in today’s international economy. It would be a gamble, of course, for China to use part of its reserves to buy enough gold bullion to displace the United States from its position as the world’s major holder of monetary gold. (As of spring 2014, U.S. holdings amounted to $328 billion.) But the penalty for being wrong, in terms of lost interest and the cost of storage, would be modest. For the rest of the world, gold prices would certainly rise, but only during the period of accumulation. They would likely fall back once China reached its goal. The broader issue -- a return to the gold standard in any form -- is nowhere on anybody’s horizon. It has few supporters in today’s virtually universal embrace of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates. From presently on gold has appropriate properties that no other currency, with the possible exception of silver, can claim.