Africa > Central Africa > Cameroon > The Ministry of Higher Education (MINESUP)

Cameroon: The Ministry of Higher Education (MINESUP)

2012/12/09

The Ministry of Higher Education (MINESUP) is bracing up in the 2013-2015 programme budget to undertake a FCFA 2.225 billion programme to modernise and professionalise classical faculties in National universities across the country. The programme, according to Minister Jacques Fame Ndongo, consists in enhancing faculty equipment and infrastructure.

In a press declaration after defending the budget on Sunday December 2, the MINSEP boss said another programme that his ministry holds in high esteem for the programme budget is the development of the technological and professional component of higher education. The FCFA 12.247 billion programme, he said, will comprise of enhancing the medical and teaching fields, enhancing technological establishments, developing professional establishments of the tertiary sector, agronomic field and cultural and touristic industries. The programme as well consists in improving female role in technological and professional higher education inclunding coordination of the management unit of the technological and professional component of higher education.

Focus will equally be on the structuring, improvement and valorisation of university research and innovation and the internationalisation of the country's higher education. This will be in the form of structuring and valorising university research, the development of university excellence poles, university cooperation, development of partnerships and planning. Improving the governance system of higher education through supervision, coordination, monitoring, follow-up and evaluation of MINESUP activities, fostering university dialogue and solidarity, university welfare and guidance inclunding developing human, financial and material resources are as well in the pipeline. Of the FCFA 223.667 billion triennial budget, 2013 is expected to consume, FCFA 48.2 billion with FCFA16 billion destined for investment while FCFA 32.2 billion will go for an optimal functioning of the ministry.

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