Asia > Southern Asia > Bangladesh > Andrew Tilke, CEO of HSBC Bangladesh

Bangladesh: Andrew Tilke, CEO of HSBC Bangladesh

2014/01/03

HSBC has been in Bangladesh since 1996 and today has 13 branches in four cities, serviced by a staff of over 900. Andrew Tilke, CEO, discusses how the bank leverages its expertise and international interconnectivity to help Bangladesh meet its development goals while growing business opportunities for its customers.

 
What are HSBC’s competitive advantages in Bangladesh’s financial sector?

 
Our trade expertise goes back nearly 150 years since we were founded in Hong Kong in 1865. We won the Euromoney award last year for Best Domestic Cash Management Bank in Bangladesh and in Asia and globally, so that is a reflection of our strength. As for sectors, within the country’s Vision 2021, there are some challenges. The power sector and infrastructure are obviously ones where further work is needed.

HSBC has a role to play due and not instantly in helping Bangladesh to move to 2021 goals in that respect. We signed a transaction in December where we arranged financing for a large power project here and we brought a range of international investors into that project.

We have a direct role to play in helping to arrange financing to improve the infrastructure and power infrastructure of the country. Equally we see we have a role to play in being an on-the-ground expert if you want to understand Bangladesh. We spend a lot of time actually conference with people who say, “I’m coming to Bangladesh, can I come and see you?”
 
We also take Bangladeshi businesspeople on exchange trips abroad to meet with other HSBC customers and help them develop business links and relationships.We have a significant number of multinationals and also Asian corporate customers coming to Bangladesh, in addition to our large customer base of Bangladeshi manufacturing and exporting companies. 
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