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Algeria: Energy: Algeria, contracts for Schlumberger and Halliburton

2012/09/18

 

 

Energy: Algeria, contracts for Schlumberger and Halliburton

Algerian energy giant Sonatrach announced it has signed four contracts with the French-US group Schlumberger and with HESP; an Algerian-American conglomerate including Halliburton; for test bores in hydrocarbon camps in Algeria.

The contracts are worth overall 573 million dollars. The contracts with Schlumberger total 341 million dollars while those with HESP (Halliburton Entreprise de services aux Puits) have a value of 232 million dollars.

HESP is a services company: 51% of its capital is owned by Algeria's Entreprise Nationale de Services aux Puits while the remaining 49% belongs to Halliburton. 

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