Africa > Southern Africa > Botswana > International Arrivals To Africa Reach More Than 18 Million In 2017

Botswana: International Arrivals To Africa Reach More Than 18 Million In 2017

2017/09/09

Market Research Company Euromonitor International revealed before this week the key trends shaping travel and tourism in Africa at the 41st Annual World Tourism Conference in Kigali, Rwanda.

According to Euromonitor International’s new data, international arrivals to Africa grew by 6.5 % in 2017, to reach 18,550 million, up from 16,351 million in 2012. Key markets such as South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria, Mozambique, Cameroon, Mauritius and Tanzania accounted for 70 % of international trips to the Sub-Saharan African region.

This increase can be attributed to digital integration and increasing interaction between hotels, airlines, and car rental companies, using platforms such as social media, meta-search engines and the penetration of online travel agents. Other drivers include a growing short-term rental market, luxury travel, niche tourism, Meetings Incentives Conferences Exhibitions (MICE) and an increasing focus on domestic tourism.

“A lot of nations are moving away from only promoting Africa as a traditional safari destination, exploring other niche categories such as beach and medical tourism. The travel and tourism market continues to introduce products that suit different type of travelers, accounting for strong increase in major cities across Sub-Saharan Africa,” says Euromonitor Research Analyst Christy Tawii.

Euromonitor predicts that increase in international arrivals to Sub-Saharan Africa will reach 25, 000 million trips by 2022. Arrivals to Africa are expected to see continued increase, driven by increased interest from overseas visitors due to competitive rates in comparison to other destinations with a similar offer. Aggressive brand marketing campaigns and the introduction of new and increased direct air connectivity to and from major overseas markets, is as well expected to boost inbound arrivals to the region. Key economies such as South Africa and Nigeria can expect strong increase in inbound trips.

Related Articles
  • Namibia Scraps Visas for Africans

    2017/11/01 Namibia has gotten the ball rolling on plans to scrap visa requirements for African passport holders next Cabinet authorised the implementation of this process - to be carried out in line with diplomatic procedures. Namibia will any minute at this time start issuing African passport holders with visas on arrival at ports of entry as a initial step towards the eventual abolition of all visa requirements for all Africans.
  • Africa: Experts Explore Infrastructure and Cooperation to Improve Lives

    2017/11/01 Addis Ababa — African economies require structural transformation to attain sustained increase that trickles down to all its peoples, an official from the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) told experts gathered at the organization’s Ethiopian headquarters. Soteri Gatera, who heads the ECA’s Industrialization and Infrastructure Section, says only such “inclusive” economic increase will help resolve the “persistent social economic problems” Africa faces.
  • The President Who Left Botswana and the World an Enduring Legacy

    2017/10/31 In the Western press, the legacies of African leaders tend to hinge on their respect for term limits, property rights, and fiscal restraint. Since his death in June 2017, the late Quett Ketumile Masire, Botswana's former Minister of Finance and Development Planning (1966-1980) and President (1980-1998), has been remembered largely in these terms. A Washington Post obituary quoted former US President Bill Clinton, who in 1998 called Masire "an inspiration to all who cherish freedom."
  • The President Who Left Botswana and the World an Enduring Legacy

    2017/10/31 In the Western press, the legacies of African leaders tend to hinge on their respect for term limits, property rights, and fiscal restraint. Since his death in June 2017, the late Quett Ketumile Masire, Botswana's former Minister of Finance and Development Planning (1966-1980) and President (1980-1998), has been remembered largely in these terms. A Washington Post obituary quoted former US President Bill Clinton, who in 1998 called Masire "an inspiration to all who cherish freedom."
  • Africa's last international banks make their stand

    2017/10/31 On June 1, 2017, Barclays sold a 33.7% stake in its African business, Barclays Africa Group Limited (BAGL). The transaction reduced the UK lender’s stake in its African offshoot to 14.9% and permitted, in accounting terms, the deconsolidation of BAGL from its parent. Additional symbolically, it brought to an end Barclays’ operations on the continent next additional than 100 years. The rise of Africa’s home-grown financial players has led most international lenders to withdraw from the continent. However, Société Générale and Standard Chartered are not only staying put but marking territory for digital expansion. James King reports.