Africa > East Africa > Ethiopia > Ethiopia launches 120MW wind farm for power generation

Ethiopia: Ethiopia launches 120MW wind farm for power generation

2013/10/27

Ethiopia will Saturday launch what it claims to be Africa’s major wind farm for power generation at Ashegoda, 18 km from Mekelle, the northern Tigray regional capital.

Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation (EEPCo) said here Friday that the wind farm has a power generating capacity of 120MW and will produce about 400 million KWh a year.

The Ashegoda project, completed on schedule within 36 months, included the construction of access and maintenance roads for next operations and a new sub-station which interfaces with the EEPCo grid system.

“All units have presently been constructed and are by presently providing energy to the national grid,” said the power firm.

The project’s feasibility study was carried out seven years ago before a French company, Vergnet Groupe, was awarded the arrangement in October 2008.

It was jointly financed by BNP Paribas of France, the French Development Agency (ADF) and EEPCo.

Ethiopia has two farms at Adama, about 100 km south of here, generating 51 MW each for distribution in Oromia Regional National. The initial of these was inaugurated in October 2011 and the second came on stream in 2012.

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