Africa > Southern Africa > Botswana > WHO lauds Africa’s progress in malaria, HIV control

Botswana: WHO lauds Africa’s progress in malaria, HIV control

2017/07/29

The World Health Organisation (WHO), has commended the African region for making significant evolution in malaria control in the last five years.

Dr Matshidiso Moeti, the WHO Regional Director for Africa, in a statement in Abuja on Tuesday, said malaria incidence and mortality rates had declined by 42 % and 66 % respectively between 2000 and 2015.

Moeti made the commendation in Kigali, Rwanda, while speaking at the Initial Africa Health Forum, launched by WHO, Africa and the Government of Rwanda.

She said for the initial time, a malaria vaccine has been launched by the organisation offering partial protection for children, particularly those vulnerable to the disease.

Moeti said domestic governments from the WHO African region contributed over $528 million to support the fight against the disease in 2015.

She said the number of adults and children newly infected with HIV in the region has as well declined by 19 % in the last five years; from 1.63 million to 1.37 million.

According to her, the region is on the verge of eradicating polio; HIV treatment scale-up is continuing with an estimated 12.1 million people receiving anti retroviral therapy (ART) by the end of 2015.

The regional director noted that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) era contributed to a lot of of the successes in the fight against these diseases.

“By the end of 2015, maternal mortality in the Region fell by 45 % from the year 2000, and newborn deaths dropped by 38 % during the same period.

“Although there had been major improvements over the last decade, there are still critical health issues that need to be discussed and tackled in order to bring the 2063 vision of health and well being into reality.

Africa has the chance; as the world is getting older, our people is getting younger.

“There is so much potential to harness this vitality and energy to create health systems that suit all.

“We need to act presently to safeguard the health of the youths by creating youth-friendly health services and encouraging healthy lifestyles.

“We want our youths to not just be beneficiaries of services, but to be with us at the decision-making table as we partner across sectors for a additional prosperous, sustainable next for everyone in Africa,” Moeti said.

She emphasised the need to work with the private sector, African philanthropists and youths to tackle these challenges and get concrete results in improving the health of the people.

Anastase Murekezi, the Prime Minister of Rwanda, was quoted as saying “partnerships and stronger collaboration are critical for better access to quality, affordable healthcare for everyone in Africa.

He said being healthy is the basis for all socio-economic development, adding that without it nothing will work.

According to Murekezi, for this reason, African nations must work together and share experiences which will translate the 2063 vision of health and well being into reality.

He, therefore, called on nations in the region to set up strategies that would help them implement the resolutions from the forum.

He urged the private sector in Africa to invest additional in the health sector, while appealing to other stakeholders to support the regions effort.

“With a rising young people, the urgent need for concrete actions to address the health of youth and adolescents will be central to the discussions at the two day forum.

Africa is the only region in the world where the people as a whole is getting younger. People under the age of 18 make up 50 % of the people in 15 nations in sub-Saharan Africa.

“However, despite the vitality of youths, HIV has disproportionately affected African children and adolescents; during the 30 years of the world HIV epidemic, around 17 million children lost one or both parents to AIDS.

“90 % of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa.

“In addition, the increase of non-communicable diseases (NCD) in Africa has seen a rise in NCD-related deaths of 27 % over the last 10 years.

“If this increase continues, there will be an obvious knock-on result on the health of young people in Africa,” the prime minister said.

The theme of the forum is “Putting People Initial: The Road to Universal Health Coverage in Africa”.

Related Articles
  • Namibia Scraps Visas for Africans

    2017/11/01 Namibia has gotten the ball rolling on plans to scrap visa requirements for African passport holders next Cabinet authorised the implementation of this process - to be carried out in line with diplomatic procedures. Namibia will any minute at this time start issuing African passport holders with visas on arrival at ports of entry as a initial step towards the eventual abolition of all visa requirements for all Africans.
  • Africa: Experts Explore Infrastructure and Cooperation to Improve Lives

    2017/11/01 Addis Ababa — African economies require structural transformation to attain sustained increase that trickles down to all its peoples, an official from the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) told experts gathered at the organization’s Ethiopian headquarters. Soteri Gatera, who heads the ECA’s Industrialization and Infrastructure Section, says only such “inclusive” economic increase will help resolve the “persistent social economic problems” Africa faces.
  • The President Who Left Botswana and the World an Enduring Legacy

    2017/10/31 In the Western press, the legacies of African leaders tend to hinge on their respect for term limits, property rights, and fiscal restraint. Since his death in June 2017, the late Quett Ketumile Masire, Botswana's former Minister of Finance and Development Planning (1966-1980) and President (1980-1998), has been remembered largely in these terms. A Washington Post obituary quoted former US President Bill Clinton, who in 1998 called Masire "an inspiration to all who cherish freedom."
  • The President Who Left Botswana and the World an Enduring Legacy

    2017/10/31 In the Western press, the legacies of African leaders tend to hinge on their respect for term limits, property rights, and fiscal restraint. Since his death in June 2017, the late Quett Ketumile Masire, Botswana's former Minister of Finance and Development Planning (1966-1980) and President (1980-1998), has been remembered largely in these terms. A Washington Post obituary quoted former US President Bill Clinton, who in 1998 called Masire "an inspiration to all who cherish freedom."
  • Africa's last international banks make their stand

    2017/10/31 On June 1, 2017, Barclays sold a 33.7% stake in its African business, Barclays Africa Group Limited (BAGL). The transaction reduced the UK lender’s stake in its African offshoot to 14.9% and permitted, in accounting terms, the deconsolidation of BAGL from its parent. Additional symbolically, it brought to an end Barclays’ operations on the continent next additional than 100 years. The rise of Africa’s home-grown financial players has led most international lenders to withdraw from the continent. However, Société Générale and Standard Chartered are not only staying put but marking territory for digital expansion. James King reports.