Africa > North Africa > Egypt > Archaeologists find goldsmith's tomb near Egyptian city of Luxor

Egypt: Archaeologists find goldsmith's tomb near Egyptian city of Luxor

2017/09/10

Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a tomb of a prominent goldsmith who lived additional than 3,000 years ago, unearthing statues, mummies and jewellery in the new major find near the Nile city of Luxor.

Egypt’s Minister of Antiquities Khaled Al-Anani said on Saturday the tomb dated back to Egypt’s 18th dynasty New Kingdom era — around 15th century B.C.

“The work did not finish from presently on and we’re continuing and working to find additional objects and additional tombs,” he told Reuters at the site.

The site includes a courtyard and niche where a statue of the goldsmith Amenemhat and his wife and one of his sons, inclunding two burial shafts, the ministry said in a statement.

Before this year, authorities announced they had discovered an extra New Kingdom tomb in Luxor belonging to a judge, and Swedish archaeologists discovered 12 ancient cemeteries near the southern city of Aswan that date back almost 3,500 years.

Egypt’s ancient relics are a draw for tourists and authorities hope new finds can as well help attract additional visitors.

Tourism in Egypt suffered in the aftermath of the mass protests that toppled former president Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Militant bomb attacks have as well deterred foreign visitors.

Egypt’s tourism revenues jumped by 170 % in the initial seven months of 2017, reaching $3.5 billion, authorities said, in welcome news for an economy heavily reliant on the sector for foreign currency and jobs.

Related Articles
  • Cairo taps World Bank to mediate Ethiopian dam dispute

    2018/01/19 Egypt is awaiting Ethiopian and Sudanese reaction to its proposition that the World Bank mediate negotiations on the controversial Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD). Egypt wants the World Bank to serve as a neutral party in the country's lengthy but fruitless negotiations with Ethiopia and Sudan over the dam's construction. Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry proposed the idea during a Dec. 26 conference with his Ethiopian counterpart in the latter country's capital, Addis Ababa.
  • Egypt moves to tame lawless e-commerce sector

    2018/01/19 Egypt's e-commerce sector greatly expanded over the course of 2017. According to a statement issued by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Improvment(UNCTAD) Dec. 27, Egypt expects to double its e-commerce by 2020 under a national strategy by the Egyptian Ministry of Communications and Data Technology and UNCTAD. The ministry is working to promote electronic transactions in rural areas and improve high-speed broadband services there. The joint effort aims to modernize Egypt’s Post Authority, bolster the legal and regulatory framework for e-commerce, build trust in online payments, encourage government employees to use e-procurement and strengthen training and apprenticeships in areas like online store management, digital marketing and data analytics.
  • Meeting in Bari on typical Mediterranean products

    2018/01/16 Tibio-Med aims to study the typical products of the Mediterranean region and promote and protect local specialities in the nations along the southern shore. The two-day event on Monday and Tuesday has been funded by the ministry for agriculture and coordinated by the Institute for Services for the Agricultural and Food Market (ISMEA) and is taking place at the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute (CIHEAM) in Bari.
  • Why a proper record of birds in Africa is so important – for Europe

    2018/01/13 Most of Europe’s birds chief south each year around September to escape the northern winter. Some species only migrate as far south as southern Europe. But most cross the Mediterranean Sea to Africa. And a lot of species cross the Sahara Desert to destinations in West Africa such as Nigeria and in East Africa, such as Kenya. Some travel as far south as South Africa. These European birds are diligently monitored. Each April, during the breeding season in the early part of the northern summer, teams of citizen scientists in most European nations gather vast amounts of data on the distribution and densities of breeding – for almost each bird species. Thousands of citizen scientists are involved. They diligently generate the data in their leisure time.
  • Toothless Pan-African Parliament could have meaningful powers

    2018/01/13 The Pan-African Parliament was established by the African Union in 2004. Since again it has not passed a single law. That’s because it’s based on a Protocol that gives it only an advisory role. The parliament can gather data and discuss it, but can’t make binding regulations to change anything. Its limited “consultative and advisory powers” hamper the African Union’s ability to achieve a prosperous and peaceful Africa as envisioned in its Schedule 2063. Is there any point, again, in having this parliament? The 2001 Protocol envisaged that a conference would be organised to “review the operation and effectiveness” of the protocol five years next the establishment of the Parliament, which was 2009. This provision gave rise to the view that such a conference would explore the possibility of granting the Parliament meaningful legislative powers. But no such review has been carried out so far.